Benzodiazipine Rehab

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Benzodiazipine Rehab

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Benzodiazipines are a group of mild tranquiliser drugs which are highly addictive and very difficult to stop once started. They are often prescribed by doctors to aid sleep disorders, anxiety disorders and back pains. They are also used as a ‘downer drug’ to counteract the effects of a stimulant like ecstasy, cocaine and speed or as a substitue for heroin. Our benzodiazepine rehab programmes will seek to resolve the underlying issues which created the addiction in the first instance.

Withdrawals from Benzos are often protracted, benzodiazipine rehabilitation is recommended to be a minimum of 28 days inpatient treatment.  Some of the collective trade names are; Valium, Ducene, Antenex, Serepax, Murelax, Alepam, Mogadon, Alodorm, Euhypnos, Normison, Temaze, Ativan, Rohypnol, Hypnodorm, Lexotan, Rivotril, Diazipine etc.

Street Names

Benzos, Bennies, Downers, Nerve Pills, Tranks,Vallies, Moggies, Rugby Balls, Roofies, Eggs, Blue, Zani, Zanibars, Peaches, Footballs

Forms

Injections, Tablets and Jellies

Doses

As there are so many different types of benzodiazipines it is difficult to quantify all of the doses but in general the doses for the more common benzodiazipines are as follows:

Diazepam

Between 6mg to 40mg per for adults suffering with anxiety. For alcohol withdrawal upto 120mg per day.

Oxazepam

The starting dose is between 5mg to 14mg daily. A private practise doctor would not normally exceed a dose of 80mg.

Nitrazepam

The usual dose for adults is 2.5mg to 10mg

Temazepam

The typical dose starting for adults is 7.5–15 mg taken just before bedtime. The maximum recommended dose is 30 mg.

Lorazepam

The maximum daily total dosage for anxiety is 10 mg given in two to three divided doses.

Flunitrazepam

Independent studies show that a 1mg dose of Flunitrazipam is optimal for people with insomnia. Flunitrazepam is manufactured in 1mg and 2mg tablets, though the 2mg tablets were taken off the market in Germany due to drug abuse.

Bromazepam

Adult dosages range between 6-30 mg daily

Clonazepam

The recommended starting clonazepam dose for treating panic disorder is clonazepam 0.25 mg twice daily. To control seizures up to a maximum of 20 mg total per day (split up into three smaller doses per day).

History

The first Benzodiazepine was Chloridiazipoxide, it was synthesised by Leo Sternbach whilst working on a tranquiliser project, however Sternbach did not notice the Chloridiazipoxide crystals and the experiments were discarded as a disappointment. Two years later in 1957 Sternbach’s colleague Earl Reeder made the discovery. Following extensive animal testing Chloridiazipoxide compound showed to have strong sedative, anti convulsant and muscle relaxant effects. Later in 1960 Chloridaizipoxide was released under the trade name Librium. It is alleged that it’s manufacturers new of its addictive potential and did not share this information with prescribing doctors. This created the largest ever class action suit involving hundreds of patients and numerous doctors.

Side Effects

Benzodiazipine side effects include drowsiness, dizziness, decreased alertness and concentration. Lack of coordination, falls and injuries, impairment of driving skills, increased risk of road traffic accidents, decreased libido, erection problems, depression, disinhibition may emerge, hypotension, suppressed breathing, nausea, changes in appetite, blurred vision, confusion, euphoria, depersonalization, nightmares, in rare instances liver toxicity.

Overdose

In ‘A systematic review of research examining Benzodiazipine overdose’ Benzodiazipine overdose is responsible for 3.8% of deaths by single drug poisoning. However this percentage rapidly increases when Benzodiazipines are mixed with alcohol, opiates and trycyclic antidepressants. Symptoms of Benzodiazipine detox can include; drowsiness, slurred speech, involuntary eye movement, hypotension, lack of coordination in hands and legs, coma, respiratory depression and cardiorespiratory arrest.

Withdrawals

Benzodiazipine withdrawal symptoms can include insomnia, gastric problems, tremors, agitation, fearfulness, muscle spasms, irritability, sweating, depersonalization, derealisation, hypersensitivity to stimuli, depression, suicidal behaviour, psychosis, seizures and delirium tremens. It can be very dangerous to withdraw rapidly from Benzodiazipines. A tapering, gradual detox is recommended.

Pharmaceutical Name

Some of the collective trade names are; Valium, Ducene, Antenex, Serepax, Murelax, Alepam, Mogadon, Alodorm, Euhypnos, Normison, Temaze, Ativan, Rohypnol, Hypnodorm, Lexotan, Rivotril

Street Names

Benzos, Bennies, Downers, Nerve Pills, Tranks,Vallies, Moggies, Rugby Balls, Roofies, Eggs, Blue, Zani, Zanibars, Peaches, Footballs

Forms

Injections, Tablets and Jellies

Doses

As there are so many different types of benzodiazipines it is difficult to quantify all of the doses but in general the doses for the more common benzodiazipines are as follows:

Diazepam

Between 6mg to 40mg per for adults suffering with anxiety. For alcohol withdrawal upto 120mg per day.

Oxazepam

The starting dose is between 5mg to 14mg daily. A private practise doctor would not normally exceed a dose of 80mg.

Nitrazepam

The usual dose for adults is 2.5mg to 10mg

Temazepam

The typical dose starting for adults is 7.5–15 mg taken just before bedtime. The maximum recommended dose is 30 mg.

Lorazepam

The maximum daily total dosage for anxiety is 10 mg given in two to three divided doses.

Flunitrazepam

Independent studies show that a 1mg dose of Flunitrazipam is optimal for people with insomnia. Flunitrazepam is manufactured in 1mg and 2mg tablets, though the 2mg tablets were taken off the market in Germany due to drug abuse.

Bromazepam

Adult dosages range between 6-30 mg daily

Clonazepam

The recommended starting clonazepam dose for treating panic disorder is clonazepam 0.25 mg twice daily. To control seizures up to a maximum of 20 mg total per day (split up into three smaller doses per day).

History

The first Benzodiazepine was Chloridiazipoxide, it was synthesised by Leo Sternbach whilst working on a tranquiliser project, however Sternbach did not notice the Chloridiazipoxide crystals and the experiments were discarded as a disappointment. Two years later in 1957 Sternbach’s colleague Earl Reeder made the discovery. Following extensive animal testing Chloridiazipoxide compound showed to have strong sedative, anti convulsant and muscle relaxant effects. Later in 1960 Chloridaizipoxide was released under the trade name Librium. It is alleged that it’s manufacturers new of its addictive potential and did not share this information with prescribing doctors. This created the largest ever class action suit involving hundreds of patients and numerous doctors.

Side Effects

Benzodiazipine side effects include drowsiness, dizziness, decreased alertness and concentration. Lack of coordination, falls and injuries, impairment of driving skills, increased risk of road traffic accidents, decreased libido, erection problems, depression, disinhibition may emerge, hypotension, suppressed breathing, nausea, changes in appetite, blurred vision, confusion, euphoria, depersonalization, nightmares, in rare instances liver toxicity.

Overdose

In ‘A systematic review of research examining Benzodiazipine overdose’ Benzodiazipine overdose is responsible for 3.8% of deaths by single drug poisoning. However this percentage rapidly increases when Benzodiazipines are mixed with alcohol, opiates and trycyclic antidepressants. Symptoms of Benzodiazipine detox can include; drowsiness, slurred speech, involuntary eye movement, hypotension, lack of coordination in hands and legs, coma, respiratory depression and cardiorespiratory arrest.

 

Benzodiazipine Withdrawals

Benzodiazipine withdrawal symptoms can include insomnia, gastric problems, tremors, agitation, fearfulness, muscle spasms, irritability, sweating, depersonalization, derealisation, hypersensitivity to stimuli, depression, suicidal behaviour, psychosis, seizures and delirium tremens. It can be very dangerous to withdraw rapidly from Benzodiazipines. A tapering, gradual detox is recommended.

If you are addicted to Benzo's we would strongly urge that you do not stop using abruptly on your own. An inpatient rehab and detox will be required to ensure that you are safe and do not return to your benzo addiction.

For more information on our benzodiazipine rehab please contact us today.

 

 

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